Monthly Archives: June 2004

If you thought parliament was dysfunctional before…

Now it’s time to govern. Oh dear.
I’m not against minority governments in principle. The late Senator Eugene Forsey, a constitutional expert though a man of the left, thought they had many merits. As his daughter Helen reminded Citizen readers a … Continue reading

Posted in Columns | Leave a comment

Strategic voting is hindered by the new election law

The 2004 election definitely calls for strategic voting. Not because it’s this election but because it’s an election. All voting is strategic. The question is whether your strategy is good, bad or ugly.
For instance, what could be more strategic than … Continue reading

Posted in Columns | Leave a comment

Our guardians need guards, too

There was a time when no one would call satisfactory any political philosophy that could not answer Juvenal’s classic question Quis custodiet ipsos custodes? Unfortunately, we have since had so much progress that we have trouble just understanding it, even … Continue reading

Posted in Columns | Leave a comment

The lesson of large mutant orange cauliflowers

If you ask me, the leaders debates would have been greatly improved by the presence of a large orange cauliflower at one of the podiums. Cynics might say they would have been greatly improved by almost anything, including a sudden … Continue reading

Posted in Columns | Leave a comment

Some kind words for rhetoric

If you watched the federal party leaders debates you may have felt as though you were subjected to “a bunch of rhetoric.” If only.
Rhetoric nowadays implies “city talk:” slick, plausible and either dishonest or a desperate attempt to cover one’s … Continue reading

Posted in Columns | Leave a comment